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Professionalism during challenging times

Becoming professional in your career takes some practice, especially now, but it is absolutely essential. There are plenty of opportunities to learn from your peers. Take advantage of them. Professionalism in dentistry goes beyond a checklist of requirements. It includes exemplifying the profession’s values and serving as an all-star representative of your employer. Professionalism is the natural ability to deliver service that’s above and beyond, and includes the way you interact with team members, patients, and managers. This is absolutely important in the workplace because it shows that you not only care about your career, but also that you respect your peers. With the events of the last year, many professionals have seen a shift in professionalism in various arenas. 1. The importance of professionalism. One reason professionalism is so important is because it’s an outward display of your attitude toward your position and employer. It’s a sign of trustworthiness, reliability, and accountability. A lack of professionalism suggests a lack of respect toward your employer, which can impact your ability to land that perfect opportunity in the future. 2. Professionally dress the part. Like it or not, appearance plays a part in how others view you. What you say and do are first impression indicators, but how you look and act can be deal breakers. Appropriate dress, whether scrubs for clinical assistants or business attire for administrative assistants, clean and neat hair, and wearing a name tag and PPE appropriately goes a very long way. 3. Communication skills a must. Nearly every profession requires employees to communicate with others through writing and face-to-face interactions. Verbal and nonverbal communication are both important, especially now with continuous wearing of masks. 4. Personal and professional ethics. Being honest and ethical suggests professionalism and should come naturally. Part of being professional means that you abide by ethics in and out of the workplace. For most, experience builds ethical decision-making skills. Compliance with state and federal requirements is expected of dental assistants. This is a safety measure to protect you and your family, your team members, and the patients you serve. 5. Calm in stressful situations. Every position has trying moments. True dental professionals can handle problems that crop up without causing a scene or complaining to team members. Everyone has troublesome days. Learn from yours so that the next time you’re faced with a similar situation it will be less of a struggle. 6. Improve your professionalism. Even if you don’t have much experience with professionalism, there are steps you can take to improve. New professionals can brush up by finding a mentor. Everyone can use networking events to gain valuable experience and put their best foot forward. Events and conferences are great places to meet people and develop professionalism. These are also opportunities to observe how others behave in a professional setting. Now that you’ve got the rundown of the importance of professionalism, you’re ready to put your best foot forward as you take your first interviews or improve in your current position. Remember to always practice professionalism inside and outside of the workplace. You never know who you may encounter—it just may be your next professional opportunity! Refer link: https://www.dentistryiq.com/dental-assisting/career-enhancements/article/14197741/professionalism-during-challenging-times

4th March, 2021

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A new answer for helping patients with xerostomia

Existing treatments often fail patients with severe xerostomia symptoms. Learn how firsthand experience became the mother of invention for one dentist. Helping patients with xerostomia can be especially challenging. Set aside for a moment the dental complications that result, such as rampant caries and mucositis. Severe symptoms like difficulty swallowing, sleeping, and talking can ruin the sufferer’s daily quality of life at the most basic level. Yet the available interventions1 come down to lifestyle tips such as sucking on ice chips, chewing sugar-free gum, and using a humidifier at night. Dr. Jeffrey Cash, a dentist in Richmond, Virginia, has experienced the frustration of dealing with xerostomia from multiple perspectives. He was initially moved by his hospital-based residency working with head-and-neck cancer patients. “My conversations with patients who had tried the standard suggestions without finding relief generally went like this: ‘Can’t you do anything else for me? I'm miserable. I can't eat properly. I wake up four times a night because I can't breathe.’ My answer, which felt terrible, amounted to ‘welcome to the new normal.’ ” Within a year of graduation, Dr. Cash learned exactly what these patients had experienced when he underwent chemotherapy as a part of his own cancer treatment. “Shortly after starting chemo, I developed severe dryness which led to mucositis. It was so uncomfortable I didn’t want to swallow or eat anything that would scratch the tissue.” The combined experience as a dentist and a xerostomia sufferer started Dr. Cash on a decades-long mission to invent a new treatment option that would be immediate, continuous, and predictable. That aspiration became a reality in 2021 with the launch of Voutia.2 Voutia3 is a wearable device incorporating a quiet, lightweight micro-pump, a water bottle, and ultrafine tubing. It closely mimics natural saliva flow by providing continuous moisture replenishment directly to the mouth. About the size of a cell phone and engineered for 24/7 use, Voutia is nearly imperceptible in normal social interaction. Patients seeking relief will continue to show up at dental practices. While the causes are medical and systemic, xerostomia is naturally seen as a dental issue since the symptoms manifest orally. It’s a common condition with an estimated prevalence of 6% at age 50, increasing to between 15% and 30% by age 65 and over.4 According to the American Dental Association, the prevalence of xerostomia rises to nearly 100% for those receiving radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and for patients with Sjögren’s syndrome.1 Compound those statistics with an aging population and the increasing number of prescriptions for medications having dry mouth as a side effect, and it becomes clear that dentists will remain on the front line in terms of supporting xerostomia sufferers. “I used what happened to me as the motivating force to create a new tool for our treatment armamentarium,” said Dr. Cash. “Unless you’ve experienced it [xerostomia] firsthand, it’s hard to understand just how profoundly this condition affects the daily life of that person sitting in your waiting room.” Refer llink: https://www.dentistryiq.com/dentistry/oral-systemic-health/article/14198725/a-new-answer-for-helping-dental-patients-with-xerostomia

5th March, 2021

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Smart technology to the rescue during COVID-19

Grab your smartphone! Dentists and patients alike have taken easily to these ubiquitous devices in order to keep dental treatment going through the pandemic. COVID- 19 has had a profound effect on the delivery of all health services, including dental care. Despite practices reopening and steadily increasing capacity, there are new instructions and protocols for COVID-secure environments that have dramatically changed how dental offices are being run. My office was forced to shut down in March, with appointments limited to emergency procedures. As a result, we ran at about 10% capacity. Since then, appointments and procedures have been steadily picking up. However, we’re working in an environment and facing challenges that dental school didn’t prepare us for. Patients returning to us can expect significant differences in the required safety procedures, not just from the dentist, but also in how they interact in the practice. The new health and safety Due to dentists working with open-mouthed patients for extended periods of time and the infection risks associated with aerosol-generated procedures, dentistry is a risky environment. This has led to key health and safety changes being reevaluated. Dentists are wearing more layers of personal protective equipment (PPE), and changing their face masks, gloves, face shields, gowns and jackets between every appointment. They also spray and clean the room thoroughly between every patient to ensure that potentially dangerous particles don’t linger in the air. While these sound like easy solutions, dental offices are struggling to access and afford the necessary amount of PPE due to continued high demand from both health-care professionals and the public. As a result, our costs are rising. For example, it cost me nearly $15,000 to reopen one office due to the need for expensive upgrades in areas such as air conditioning, medical-grade air purifiers, and UV light on air conditioners. These time-consuming decontamination processes and extensive PPE measures have dramatically reduced the number of patients that can be treated in a day. My offices are currently running at 75%–80% capacity, so I’m still seeing fewer patients per day in order to lower risks and contact points. This means fewer patients but increased costs. The digital upgrade Many dental offices are turning to technology to help alleviate some of the pressures as they transition to new health and safety regulations. For example, recent developments in smartphone cameras and dental apps, part of a growing category of smart dental solutions, means that the assessment component of dental care can be completed through the use of devices such as smartphones rather than through face-to-face contact. Of course, to have a full consultation I would need access to an x-ray machine, which isn’t possible through a phone. However, one of the key factors when managing dental offices during COVID-19 is limiting interaction and having patients in the office for as short a time as possible. So, if I can have a virtual consultation before someone even enters the office, I save chair time and treat more people in the working day. Through simply seeing pictures taken on smartphones, I gain a good understanding of what treatment must be done before someone even walks through the door. This is more important during the pandemic as it limits the risk of transmission while saving time and resources for both the patient and me. This is a real advantage for patients as they can get clinical recommendations from a licensed dentist on any dental issue from the safety of their own home. I’ve seen more and more live communication on these apps as it offers personalized health care and a one-stop-shop for consumers, providing quick answers to their problems effectively and safely. I’m excited to see how these solutions evolve to reach even more patients and become even more valuable to our practices. Refer link: https://www.dentistryiq.com/practice-management/practice-management-tips/article/14197690/smart-technology-to-the-rescue-during-covid

5th March, 2021

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This is our shot

I concluded 2020 by taking a shot at ending the virus that forever changed dentistry. On the morning of December 22, 2020, I received the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. Walking into Methodist Hospital, I felt nervous, blessed, and optimistic. I was nervous because of the unknowns associated with the vaccine, but I silenced my fears by reminding myself of the reason I decided to get immunized—my father. My father is currently battling liver cancer, and his cancer treatment was postponed for months because he had contracted COVID-19. I also felt immensely blessed to be eligible to receive the vaccine through my employment at TOMAGWA HealthCare Ministries, a nonprofit health clinic. Unfortunately, not all dental professionals are fortunate enough to currently be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. In fact, in Texas, it has yet to be determined into what phase of the vaccine allocation dental professionals will be categorized. Essentially nonessential While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has stated that dentists and dental hygienists are to be included in the CDC’s 1A phase of the COVID-19 distribution, many states are not following these guidelines.Individual states are determining their own phases and not including dental professionals in phase 1A, leaving dental professionals who already work in one of the unhealthiest settings even more vulnerable. Understanding immunity If you have had the privilege to be immunized, it is important to note that neither of the two vaccines is 100% effective at preventing the contraction of COVID-19. Furthermore, it takes weeks after receiving the second dose for COVID-19 vaccine to reach immunity. For these reasons, individuals who receive the vaccine must still social distance and wear masks. It is believed that if you receive the vaccine and then contract the coronavirus, your symptoms will be milder than if you had not been immunized.8 Nonetheless, if you are hoping that receiving the vaccine will lead to less stringent guidelines for personal protective equipment (PPE), you will be disappointed. Although the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines provide over 90% immunity, there is still a possibility of contracting the virus and spreading it to others. Furthermore, at this time, it is unknown how much of the population will need to be immunized to reach herd immunity.Thus, it is necessary to continue following proper infection control and PPE guidelines. Comparing the vaccines If you are eligible for the vaccine and are considering getting immunized, here is what you need to know about the vaccines. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized both vaccines for emergency use.The vaccines are formulated from spike protein mRNA, meaning they do not contain the live virus and thus cannot infect individuals with COVID-19.6,7 They also both have age restrictions; Pfizer’s is authorized for those 16 years and older, while Moderna is approved for those 18 years and older.Both vaccines require two shots, a priming dose and a booster shot.Providers receiving the Pfizer vaccine will receive their booster approximately 21 days after their initial dose.6 Those receiving the Moderna vaccine will have to wait 28 days after the priming dose.It is advised that both shots, priming and booster, be the same brand. When it comes to effectiveness, the Pfizer vaccine clinical trials indicated that it is 95% effective at preventing COVID-19 infection. Moderna’s studies concluded that it is 94.5% effective at preventing COVID-19 infection. It is also important to note that the duration of immunity from the COVID-19 vaccine is not known at this time. Similar to other vaccines, COVID-19 vaccines have mild short-term side effects. These include pain at injection site, fatigue, headache, muscle pain, joint pain, and chills. Personally, I had a sore arm for two days after receiving the Pfizer vaccine. I have received the flu vaccine every year for the past decade and usually develop a sore arm, but I was noticeably sorer from the COVID-19 vaccine. The soreness was not significant enough to impede daily activity. An important but personal decision The decision to get immunized against COVID-19—at this time or at all—is a personal decision. Individuals are advised to discuss receiving the vaccine with their physicians to determine if it is appropriate for them. If you are interested in receiving the COVID-19 vaccine and are unsure if you are eligible to receive it, you can contact your local health department. The American Dental Association also has an interactive guide on their website with information on individual states and vaccine regulations for dentists. I will receive my second dose of the Pfizer vaccine on January 13 and hope that immunity will aid me in maintaining the Hippocratic oath of doing no harm. For me, it is not only about my personal health, but also about not infecting other fathers, mothers, grandmothers, grandfathers, and loved ones. Refer link: https://www.dentistryiq.com/covid-19/article/14196851/this-is-our-shot

5th March, 2021

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Hypnosis Applied to Dental Practice: A review

Hypnosis is stereotypically thought of as a method of manipulation and that’s because of the myths that built misconceptions and erroneous mental representations around it . In fact, the main aim of hypnotherapy is not to manipulate the patient, but to give them the tools they require to take back control of their behaviors, feelings and emotions. “Hypnosis” is originally a Greek word that means “sleep”. It represents a naturally modified conscious state. The individual gets into a hypnotic state called trance, which is not artificially induced and is different from the usual awareness state . The observation of neurophysiological changes assert this altered consciousness, which differentiates it from states of meditation or relaxation. Although in a hypnotic state the subject is highly attentive to suggestion, they maintain concentration and keep the potential to make their own decisions at any time. Dentists who use hypnosis regularly in their clinical practices appreciate a variety of significant advantages. There are many and varied applications of clinical hypnosis in dental clinical practice. Dental applications of hypnosis include relaxation, relief from fears and anxieties, reduction in both the perception and severity of pain during procedures, control of bleeding and salivation (both for increasing and decreasing flow, as needed), control of bruxism (tooth grinding), finger-sucking, and other habits, and promotion of behavioral modifications associated with optimization of oral health. Amongst a lot of options for behaviour management and modifications, hypnotics is one of the oldest and non-invasive way to control dental anxiety in children, adult as well as in geriatric patients and hence get a better treatment result and a good compliance and satisfaction of the patient. How does it work? It’s thought that hypnosis provides direct access to a person’s subconscious mind . In essence, it is the subconscious which is mainly responsible for a lot of what we do and how we feel. Science has agreed that hypnosis involves being in a trance state, experiencing relaxation at the same time as heightening the mind’s imagination. In this state, where the subconscious is released, we observe an alteration in the composition of neural oscillations especially in Prefrontal Cortex and Right occipital EEG channels . The mind is extremely susceptible to the hypnotherapist’s suggestions, which push the subjects’ focus to their inner world to influence their perception, feelings, thinking and behaviour. But to be of effect, suggestions must be acceptable to the subject. Use of hypnosis in the dental practice Hypnosis can bring considerable relief to anxious patients and make it easier for the dentist to do their job but it is particularly implemented in order to help patients relax. As relaxation raises the pain threshold, requirement for local anaesthesia is reduced. And even if it is necessary, it is better tolerated. Therefore, the use of hypnosis as a general relaxation strategy is certainly possible and there are reports in the literature of its use in both adults and children. Moreover, clinical benefits can be derived from hypnosis such as the control of dentophobia, abnormally active gag reflex, trigeminal neuralgia pain, benign chronic orofacial pain, temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD), adaptation to dentures, behaviour modification, like thumb sucking, bruxism. Additionally, hypnosis can control salivary flow and bleeding. Xerostomia and haemostasis can be produced through hypnotic suggestions, such as visualizing being in a desert on a hot day and noticing how dry the mouth becomes because of lack of water. Mental imagery of the ligation of a bleeding vessel can be used to decrease bleeding after soft tissue surgery. Hypnosis in children and adolescents is possible, but, much harder to administer than in the adults. It is also true that not everybody is susceptible to hypnosis, as it is apparent that this phenomenon has also some association with genetics and brain structure . Hypnotic suggestion is used in the management of paediatric patients as well. This involves the techniques of distraction, reframing and imagery suggestions. It is effective with kids aged 8–12 years, but even a four-year-old child can show responsiveness. Furthermore, the operative use of hypnosis includes analgesia during surgery. It has been largely superseded by pharmaceutical sedation and general anaesthetics. When using hypnosis for analgesia, the patient must reach deep hypnosis, which takes time, and have an environment free from distractions and interruptions. Current methods of hypnosis A distinction arises between a deep type of hypnosis and a light one and both have different applications. Deep hypnosis takes long so it is not apt for regular dental practice; however, it is required for analgesia and behaviour modification. On the other hand, the ‘light’ state is easier and faster to attain and is used in hypnodontia on a daily basis; for instance, to relax a nervous patient in a matter of minutes. Dentists have to use positive suggestions managing patients. Words or actions that inspire trust in the dentist will relieve the patient’s anxiety and fear. Informal hypnotic methods include the use of utterances like “you will feel quite comfortable” or “you will like the results” and this can be a powerful technique of patient management. Suggestions can be categorized into two broad types: direct and indirect. Direct suggestion involves straightforward statements that are clearly understood by the hypnotic subject. An example would be: “don’t move your head because you won’t be able to before finishing.” Indirect suggestion uses indirectness in addressing the subject in a form of covert hypnotic statements. That is to say the subject is hypnotized without their knowledge. The above-mentioned example would be said during a conversation in this way: “well, you might not be able to move your head before finishing.” Conclusion Hypnosis has many uses within the dental field, ranging from simple relaxation of the anxious patient to complete analgesia for surgery. Clinical hypnosis can be an incredibly valuable tool in dentistry. Courtesy: Dental News

4th March, 2021

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What they don’t (but should) teach in dental school

It's well known that the business side of dentistry is overlooked in dental school. These business tips from an expert will help new dentists down a path toward success. Dental school is cool, but did you receive many business tips? Dental school is expensive, so you can’t blame the staff for focusing on clinical instruction. However, practicing good dentistry is only one part of a successful business model. There are steps dentists can take to prevent their staffs from coming to them with challenges they don’t want to deal with, or worse yet, don’t understand. I’ve created a list of concrete tips that will help any new dental practice owner get an immediate jump on becoming a smart businessperson. Embrace the logic within these ideas to not only save money, but also impress your team with your decision making. Most likely, you’ll have fewer interruptions while you’re focusing on your patients. Order smart and be loyal Since COVID-19 changed everyone’s lives, the supply chain landscape has been substantially changed. Never in recent history has any event disrupted business with the worldwide magnitude that this pandemic has, forcing people in all industries to reevaluate a multitude of needs and habits. Personal protective equipment stock alone called for several changes, but there are shortages, delays, or backorders on everything from medicine to replacement parts. Now is the time to order early, and to consider ordering by the case for items you use frequently (if the items won’t eat up too much storage space). Many staffs worry because they order something one or two days before they run out, and they simply will not be able to perform an upcoming procedure without it. It isn’t the distributor’s fault. It’s the pandemic. Do yourself a favor and assign inventory management to someone on staff who knows the products and how much you use of each item. You may carry more inventory, but better that than running out and repeatedly playing the “get crazy until I get it” game. This is where loyalty comes in and makes a big difference. Every major distributor has a loyalty program designed to measure how much business you conduct with them. I’ve said time again, it’s child’s play to go back and forth because one vendor has a few items a bit cheaper than another. A smart dental team takes the time to understand the rewards programs. These include spending promotions to qualify for rebates, point per dollar spending for many of the items bought, and best of all, discounts on goods and services themselves. The time spent searching for cheaper products pales in comparison to the money you save by using the service team of the company from which you order all of your supplies. Bonus tip: Because you spend all of your money with them, you also get faster service. Embrace technology It seems like revolutionary new dental technology innovates the dental industry on some level almost constantly. There is a lot to learn with each new toy, and you don’t have to do it alone. Good team members want to take this off your hands, and your willingness to let them in on the fun will encourage them to stick around. Those coming out of dental school today are just dying to get their hands on the new equipment, but few have the money to purchase their own. You will attract better talent if you prove to be a cutting-edge dentist rather than one struggling to stay relevant with ‘80s equipment and decor. Your current and future employees will know it, and so will your patients. Technology and innovation dazzles. Learn basic accounting Many doctors leave the ordering, service calls, and bill-paying duties to others while they focus solely on dentistry. Consider this a bit of willful ignorance. I’ve seen many accounts get so far behind that when it gets to the point where the doctor examines the invoices, he or she is confused about such things as service labor rates, supply pricing, or billing cycles. Understanding the monthly cycle of invoices is basic, but very helpful. Essentially, on one date each month the billing stops so that the record of everything billed that month can be prepared and sent out in one statement. Also, be aware of fixed pricing items such as the hourly service rates and monthly eservices (claims processing), and have a basic understanding of your supply pricing. A good sales rep will get you all of this information and will help you capitalize on competitive pricing and promotions (see loyal customer in number one), but it helps if you know the basic topics. Some pricing benefits are applied automatically based on your order history and whether you meet the requirements for the company’s loyalty program. Bonus tip: If you aren’t prepared to throw all your business their way, don’t tell them you need better pricing. It’s called a partnership for a reason. Choose, treat, and empower your team wisely As I said, technology will attract talented people, but nurturing their talent and keeping them engaged is your job. It’s important for any business owner to have empathy. In other words, be able to put yourself in their shoes and see things from another perspective. Treat them as you would a family member until they give you a reason not to. Take things such as emergencies and hardships in stride; they’ll appreciate the absence of stress from having to tell their employer when things go wrong, and that goodwill goes a long way in building loyalty, honesty, and mutual respect. Wouldn’t we all prefer a boss who didn’t harp on our problems later? Allow your team to make some lower-level decisions. Maybe it’s ordering decisions, maybe it’s adjusting the bill of someone who can’t pay (within limits of course). Letting your team members get some decision making under their belts will help when you assign them more responsibilities. Obviously, you’ll empower some people more than others, but hopefully the main idea is the same. If that seems like a daunting idea, perhaps you can test the water by asking their opinions in order to evaluate their judgment before handing over more responsibility. Bonus tip: The more staff members you develop and trust, the less you must pile on your own plate. Extra bonus tip: Make sure one of your team members can work on social media for you. It’s an absolute must in today’s digital world. Friend a transition broker I recently wrote an article on the importance of transition experts. It does not cost a thing to talk shop with these people. They exist for one purpose: to know everything about their local dental community. Long term, they’d love to help you when you need to bring in another doctor, sell or relocate your practice, or purchase a practice. In the meantime, all they want to do is learn about you and your practice and advise you on decisions that add value to your business. Have you seen The Godfather? Think about having your own, private consigliere (said in my best Marlon Brando voice). Your sales rep can put you in touch with the local team. These experts are crucial in the years before you retire. And why not get a jump on the future by getting to know them and learn the steps to getting out? I hope these ideas bring about positive changes in your thinking and practice. What may be second nature to some might be hidden in the back of the minds of others. A good thing to remember is that good, multitask hiring (look for multiple skill sets in one person) will avoid a lot of frustrating moments. As a rule, assembling a team with an abundance of knowledge and skill sets will give you a lot less to worry about in the long run. Here’s to happy days ahead. Refer link: https://www.dentistryiq.com/practice-management/new-dentists/article/14197589/what-they-dont-but-should-teach-in-dental-school

16th February, 2021

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Smart technology to the rescue during COVID-19

Grab your smartphone! Dentists and patients alike have taken easily to these ubiquitous devices in order to keep dental treatment going through the pandemic. COVID- 19 has had a profound effect on the delivery of all health services, including dental care. Despite practices reopening and steadily increasing capacity, there are new instructions and protocols for COVID-secure environments that have dramatically changed how dental offices are being run. My office was forced to shut down in March, with appointments limited to emergency procedures. As a result, we ran at about 10% capacity. Since then, appointments and procedures have been steadily picking up. However, we’re working in an environment and facing challenges that dental school didn’t prepare us for. Patients returning to us can expect significant differences in the required safety procedures, not just from the dentist, but also in how they interact in the practice. The new health and safety Due to dentists working with open-mouthed patients for extended periods of time and the infection risks associated with aerosol-generated procedures, dentistry is a risky environment. This has led to key health and safety changes being reevaluated. Dentists are wearing more layers of personal protective equipment (PPE), and changing their face masks, gloves, face shields, gowns and jackets between every appointment. They also spray and clean the room thoroughly between every patient to ensure that potentially dangerous particles don’t linger in the air. While these sound like easy solutions, dental offices are struggling to access and afford the necessary amount of PPE due to continued high demand from both health-care professionals and the public. As a result, our costs are rising. For example, it cost me nearly $15,000 to reopen one office due to the need for expensive upgrades in areas such as air conditioning, medical-grade air purifiers, and UV light on air conditioners. These time-consuming decontamination processes and extensive PPE measures have dramatically reduced the number of patients that can be treated in a day. My offices are currently running at 75%–80% capacity, so I’m still seeing fewer patients per day in order to lower risks and contact points. This means fewer patients but increased costs. The digital upgrade Many dental offices are turning to technology to help alleviate some of the pressures as they transition to new health and safety regulations. For example, recent developments in smartphone cameras and dental apps, part of a growing category of smart dental solutions, means that the assessment component of dental care can be completed through the use of devices such as smartphones rather than through face-to-face contact. Of course, to have a full consultation I would need access to an x-ray machine, which isn’t possible through a phone. However, one of the key factors when managing dental offices during COVID-19 is limiting interaction and having patients in the office for as short a time as possible. So, if I can have a virtual consultation before someone even enters the office, I save chair time and treat more people in the working day. Through simply seeing pictures taken on smartphones, I gain a good understanding of what treatment must be done before someone even walks through the door. This is more important during the pandemic as it limits the risk of transmission while saving time and resources for both the patient and me. This is a real advantage for patients as they can get clinical recommendations from a licensed dentist on any dental issue from the safety of their own home. I’ve seen more and more live communication on these apps as it offers personalized health care and a one-stop-shop for consumers, providing quick answers to their problems effectively and safely. I’m excited to see how these solutions evolve to reach even more patients and become even more valuable to our practices. Refer link: https://www.dentistryiq.com/practice-management/practice-management-tips/article/14197690/smart-technology-to-the-rescue-during-covid

24th February, 2021

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